Finished a draft, but the wrong one. The Unintended

is done. At least its first full draft. (I ended up finishing the wrong novel, not William McKinley’s World. Oh well. Still working on that.) A place holder website on some matters that come up in the novel right here. Yep, it includes Elvis. And Muhammad Ali. And Gus, the polar bear of Central Park zoo. And the stories of six women moved by loss. And, of course, Balangiga, which I know too much about. Finishing a novel is like shedding research notes, fact after fact, coming off like scabs.

http://ginaapostol.wix.com/praxino#!articles-of-war-articles-of-interest/c1wiq

 

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Foreign Policy asked me to write an editorial on the visit of President Obama to Manila

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Here is the opinion piece: “Imperialism 2.0,” in Foreign Policy. Note that the backdrop in the picture, a kind of chilling mirror of this modern event, is Juan Luna’s painting “Pacto de Sangre” (or Blood Compact: in that case between Sikatuna and Legazpi, in this case between Barack Obama and Benigno Aquino III).

Ten Months Captive among Filipinos

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Research for The Unintended, a novel in progress about the Philippine American War

A lovely and astonishing book about Filipinos in Malolos, Bulacan, during the time of war with the Americans in 1899—from the recollections of an American prisoner, who’s actually quite an amusing writer

“Sacrifice to Aguinaldo’s ambition”: caption on 1899 stereo card

Sacrifice to Aguinaldo's ambition

I bought this stereo card by bidding on it. It went quite high—up to forty-five bucks—but look at it. It is haunting.

I love CounterPunch: “America’s best political newsletter”

Click here for the review from CounterPunch

Gun Dealers’ Daughter now has the interesting distinction of being picked up by the longstanding neocon journal Commentary early in the summer (its first mention) and by  the great radical newsletter, CounterPunch, started by the late great Alexander Cockburn (also of the The Nation). I heart CounterPunch.

Charles R. Larson, emeritus professor of literature at American University, Washington, DC, says of the novel:

“And that complex narration is, in fact, one of the major strengths of this classic example of madness and trauma, repression and guilt. Gina Apostol’s Gun Dealers’ Daughter is a haunting study of misplaced actions by corrupt governments and the naifs who believe they can make them accountable.”

The chief with Company C

The chief with Company C

Valeriano Abanador, hero of Balangiga, in August 1901 with American soldiers of Company C. In September he masterminded the plan to kill them.